Tag Archives: australia

“Children Don’t Belong in Jail”: new protest song from Luke Buda and Don McGlashan

Quite a few songs have been written about, or to raise awareness of, the inhumane conditions individuals and families experience that are forcefully constrained within the refugee camp on the South Pacific island of Nauru. A new collaboration between Luke Buda and Don McGlashan raises awareness about the issue. It has been reported that children are suffering within the refugee camp and Doctors Without Borders have raised their grave concerns over the matter.

We should all be able to agree that children do not belong in jail. At any moment.

 

 

Here are more organizations that work with refugee rights in the region:

 


 

A Protest music Interview: Stabbitha and the Knifey Wifeys

Cars, tractors and other vehicles are important to the writing process for Adelaide’s feminist, punk rock quartet Stabbitha and the Knifey Wifeys as bassist and vocalist Eb tells me via email. Words apparently come storming to her while driving and even the band’s unique name came to her while driving a tractor (a Simpsons episode reference where Chief Wiggum calls Marge both ‘Stabbitha’ and ‘The Knifey Wifey’).

SATKW just released their first full length album, following the brilliant 2016 effort, Cats Against Cat Calls. Eb told me about the approach they took to the creative process on ‘Worriers’ and the differences to the previous album.

“I guess the main difference in the process of making ‘Worriers’ is when we booked in the recording we only had a couple of songs fully written. So it was a different process in that we were more, almost forced, to write songs rather than have a few up our sleeves that Eb had already written like on ‘Cats Against Cat Calls’. We also had a lot better idea of what we wanted the finished record to sound like and were able to communicate that a bit better to Uptoe (Alex Upton – the Hard Aches).

As far as the creative process goes, there were a lot of lyrics written while driving around in my car, a lot of music written on my couch while being harassed by 2 needy dogs and couple written in our actual rehearsal space. Sass and I (Eb) also consulted each other a fair bit more regarding the lyrics on the album as well and how they were going to fit into the actual songs. I have a tendency to write way too many lyrics for short songs haha.”

33234773_1749900065090398_5753810250129997824_o
‘WORRIERS’, is out now.

SATKW have a lot to say. Which is understandable and much appreciated here at Shouts. While they cover a vast political ground on ‘Worriers’ Eb explained there was the personal stuff that was the toughest to put out.

“There’s a whole lot of basically saying ‘we’ve had enough of your shit’. Whether that be sexism, racism, domestic violence, bigotry or double standards in general. The song ‘Worriers’ is the one that was the hardest to put out there though as I wrote it about how coming out to your parents is fucking terrifying!”

 

 

As Eb describes there seems to be quite a decent amount of bands working in Adelaide these days that use their voice responsibly. We at Shouts can agree that there is no lack of protest music coming out of Australia these days as we have recently interviewed two artists out of neighbouring Melbourne (Formidable Vegetable Sound System and Pataphysics). I asked Eb what they wanted to achieve with their music and besides the chance to tour internationally she told me how they want to inspire girls to use their voices.

“…we want help young people, particularly young women, queer/trans/nb kids see that their voices and experiences are important. We want to hear what you’ve got to say and hope our art inspires you to put yours out there too.”

 

I also asked the band if they had some recommendations and favourites when it comes to protest music. They of course answered the call by name dropping legends like Anti Flag and Bad Religion but also gave a shout out to some fierce, bands that, just like SATKW, scream their lungs out for the voiceless of this world. These include Cable Ties, Against Me, Outright,  Gouge Away, Dream Nails and Divide and Dissolve.

 

When asked what is on the horizon for Stabbitha and the Knifey Wifeys, besides writing music and attending to extra curricular activism Eb told me that they spend a good amount of time to “convince our bosses to give us time off work so we can tour interstate more!”

Let’s just hope exactly that happens. Sponsor the band, let’s spread this protest music and check out their album ‘Worriers’ below.

 

Pataphysics (interview)

In November of last year an album was released filled with political hip hop and smooth jazz and soul driven tones. The artist, engineer and producer, Pataphysics, writes on his Bandcamp page that the album was recorded on the land of the Wurundjeri people in Australia. I contacted Pat to learn more about that statement, about this latest album of his, flow vs. content and his work with the refugee community in Melbourne.

 

 

For those not familiar with your work, who is Pataphysics?

I write lyrics, produce music, play trumpet as well, record, and mix a bunch.

 

How did you get into making music?

I always loved music, I used to rap in primary school, just making up lyrics about anything. Got more focused in high school.

 

You recently published a new album, Tip of the Spear (Nov. 2017). How was the process behind making that album?

On this record I try do dig deeper, engaging with content I had not previously wrote about. A lot of the songs and ideas presented on this record took a while to develop and articulate. I wrote a lot of songs and music until I achieved the sound/vision I had in my mind.

 

What are some of the greater developments since your debut album, Subversive (2012)?

I have enjoyed performing live and touring. Released an EP, then working on the new album while taking time to write and collaborate on other projects.

 

Has social consciousness or political messages always been a part of your music making or has it evolved gradually?

Ever since I started performing I enjoyed exploring these ideas. As I have grown as a person and thinker so has my content.

 

“If you are saying important things but have no flow, the listener might not feel it. I feel it’s like a poisoned tipped arrow. If one doesn’t get you, the other will.”

 

How important is it for you to write lyrics with the right political words versus less important words but that flow better for the rhythm of the song?

They are just as equal in my mind. Both need to be 100. If you are saying important things but have no flow, the listener might not feel it. I feel it’s like a poisoned tipped arrow. If one doesn’t get you, the other will.

 

You are the Music and Arts coordinator of R.I.S.E. (Refugees, Survivors, and Ex Detainees). Can you tell us more about that project and how you got to be a part of that?

R.I.S.E is the only organisation of its type run by refugees in this country. It does amazing work in the community. I often would work and mentor emerging artists in an informal capacity, when R.I.S.E began they asked me to help out and I was more than happy to help.

 

It is stated on your Bandcamp page that the album is recorded on the land of the Wurundjeri people. Can you tell us more about that?

They are the traditional owners of Narrm (Melbourne). The people who were here before invasion. Australia is one of the only countries that doesn’t have a treaty with its first nation peoples.

 

Refugees and the movement of people seems to be a topic you touch upon in more than one song. How important is the that issue for you? Is it close to you where you live?

In Australia we lock refugees indefinitely in “detention centres” prisons. This is against International conventions we have signed.

 

Who are your favorite political musicians out there, current or old?

Public Enemy were a HUGE influence on me. Chuck D is such an amazing human. Also love Rage against the Machine. These days ‘Bambu de Pistola’ is one of my favourites.

 

What’s on the horizon for you?

Bunch of live shows, finally getting out of the studio more now that the album is finished and out. But I am also writing more music, working on new material and producing for a number of artists in Melbourne.

 

Thank you so much for participating and for the work and music you make. Anything else you would like to shout from the rooftops?

If you wanna hear my album and my other music it’s available on spotify here: https://open.spotify.com/artist/5nIM4nB0A65tmrwoG1GH3w

 

 


Cover photo by Paul H.