Tag Archives: women’s rights

Petrol Girls Release New Song On International Women’s Day Featuring Janey Starling

The song, Fight For Our Lives, pays tribute to the global fight against femicide and gender based violence.

All proceeds from the sales of the song go to UK based Level Up. This feminist organisation is building an interactive, virtual database of femicide victims across the UK and Chile, aiming to scale up in the future.

See also: Femicide And The Punk Rock Scene In Chile: Interview With Sin Lenceria

This time around the band brought in reinforcements. Janey Starling, former lead singer of Dream Nails and co-director of Level Up, is a perfect fit and she lends her furious voice and lyrical wizardry to the feminist anthem.

Janey wrote about the origins of the International Women’s Day for the Guardian in 2019 and how it’s rooted in “working-class and migrant women’s protests against life-threatening conditions in sweatshops”.

She will be joining the band on stage on the 19th of March as they perform at the Punks Against Sweatshops show in London.

Cover photo credits: Martyna Wisniewska


‘Flores Rojas’: Rebeca Lane Normalises Menstruation In New Music Video

Listen to this article here.

In the year 2022 it is quite remarkable that people are still battling to normalise a completely normal bodily function and trying to tear down the stigmas around it.

Yet, that is still the case, and girls and women around the world continue to face social difficulties when it comes to menstruation. In many places education about menstruation comes late, if ever, on top of many girls and women having to battle lack of water and access to personal hygiene products.

Photo taken from Rebeca Lane’s Bandcamp page.

With her latest single, ‘Flores Rojas’ (Red Flowers), Guatemalan rapper Rebeca Lane tries to use her talents to educate both young and old about this amazing and powerful part of the women’s body.

The animated video follows a young girl around, doing all the things society tells girls they can’t do while menstruating. The music video, and the song, is an ode to the female body and the feminine spirit around the world.

“My grandmother, the moon
Sows my womb
Various seeds to keep
And every month flowers germinate in me
They’re red like my menstrual blood”

“To menstruate with dignity is a human right”, Rebeca writes on her Bandcamp page. In many countries, though, it is seen as something dirty and unnatural. According to this article, “across Africa it is estimated that one in 10 girls will miss school when they have their periods, and can miss approximately 10-20% of school days – factors which can lead to them dropping out altogether. This puts them at greater risk of child marriage, and getting pregnant at a younger age, which comes with heightened health risks.”

Rebeca understands that there is still a great deal of work ahead and hopefully her beautiful music video can help create a positive change for women and young girls around the world.

Rebeca’s new album, Florecer, comes out in April 2022.


New Book Highlights The Work Of Women In Music

Rewriting or editing written history is a daunting task. Unfortunately though, it is a necessary one. What children learn about the world today, is more often than not based on information put together by men. And so the information tenda to be one-sided, lacking and sometimes literally false.

See also: New Interview Series Shines A Light On Women In The Music Business

A new book intends to help a new narrative find ground. This Woman’s Work: Essays on Music is edited by Kim Gordon and Sinéad Gleeson and it features essays by musicians and music journalists about the genre-breakers, the experimentalists and the women who mixed music and activism.

This Woman’s Work seeks to confront the male dominance and sexism that have been hard-coded in the canons of music, literature, and film and has forced women to fight pigeon-holing or being side-lined by carving out their own space.”

According to the book’s press release these women seek to shatter the dominating narrative and one can only imagine how that can empower and motivate young women of the future to venture fearlessly into the creative arts.

“Women have to speak up, to shout louder to tell their story – like the auteurs and ground-breakers featured in this collection, including: Anne Enright on Laurie Anderson; Megan Jasper on her ground-breaking work with Sub Pop; Margo Jefferson on Bud Powell and Ella Fitzgerald; and Fatima Bhutto on music and dictatorship.”

This Woman’s Work: Essays on Music is released on April 7 by White Rabbit.