Tag Archives: women’s rights

New Interview Series Shines A Light On Women In The Music Business

There is plenty of women in the music business, not only as musicians but also as engineers and producers. Problem is, not many shed a light on these women and so the global view tends to look masculine.

Proof In Music is one of the projects trying to change that narrative with a 12 episode video series documenting the work of these women.

Follow Proof In Music on Facebook and be sure to sign up on their webpage to never miss an episode!

Cover photo of music producer Ainjel Emme from the webpage of Proof In Music.

New Single ‘Survivor’ by Saffron A Released Today On International Women’s Day

Saffron A, a young and brave fighter out of Brantford, Ontario, is releasing a new single today, the 8th of March, which is the International Women’s Day. We have interviewed Saffron before about her previous EP’s.

Saffron herself is a survivor of sexual assault and at one point she decided to create powerful and beautiful music in hope to inspire others to cope with their own trauma. She wrote ‘Survivor’ for all the people that have shared their stories with her.

“Here’s where you found me
Here’s where they left me
For all these years I’ve been quiet
I have taken the weight of silence”

‘Survivor’ is from Saffron’s upcoming album Survivors Are Fighters for which she has a GoFundMe page up and running.

If you catch Saffron playing live you will notice her special blue faded Levi’s jeans. These are her Consent Pants:

“When I did two collaborative shows with Advocates for A Student Culture of Consent, I came up with the idea for people to respond to the music and workshop by writing/drawing/expressing what consent means to them on a pair of jeans. It turned out so well, I brought them out to almost every show on tour and encouraged the audience to add their piece. It became a community art project, and now I wear the jeans when I perform.”

“They didn’t believe me
Refused to hear me
When someone they knew
Violated me

The secret I buried
The one that I carried alone”

Saffron decided to release this song on the International Women’s Day to celebrate those who have found the courage to speak out, take a stand and oppose the current system.

“In the age of the #MeToo movement, this song validates and empowers the diverse stories of survivors of sexual violence… I see you, I hear you, I believe you.”

Song Of The Day: Juanita Tres Cosas By Sin Lencería

One barely needs to hear the music to understand that this protest song is made by and for women. The illustrated cover image says it all with the young girl in kung fu clothing, handling both the football and the inked skateboard while not giving a crap about what anyone thinks about her. Just like how boys were lucky enough to grow up.

Juanita Tres Cosas is a punk rock anthem made for young girls around the planet who believe (and rightly so) that they can fight the same fight and do the same things as the boys they grew up next to. ‘Juanita tres cocos’ (Juanita three testicles) is a common Chilean saying that degrades and makes fun of “masculine girls”.

Sin Lencería, took that, twisted it, owned it and made this song.

“Juanita Tres Cosas is a song about growing up being a girl that doesn’t fit girly standards. While people expect little girls to play with dolls or look nice all the time, there’s a lot of others that prefer sports and play in the mud and sometimes that makes them suffer bullying. So this is a song dedicated to them (and also our own younger selves) to remind us that gender shouldn’t define what we can or can’t do!”

“Juanita Tres Cosas
no te dejes deprimir
Las niñas también tienen
Libertad de decidir”


Juanita Tres Cosas
don’t allow yourself to be depressed
girls also have
the freedom to choose

The illustrated design for Juanita Tres Cosas comes in part from the band members’ experiences as kids as well as from the stereotypes they witnessed around them as girls and later as women in society.

“One of us wanted to play karate as a kid but her family put her in ballet instead because it was more ‘feminine’, another wanted to play football, but in the 90’s there wasn’t a female football team to join, and the other always loved skating, but sometimes skirts and dresses got in the way. So that’s why in the cover there’s a girl with a karate uniform, a ball and a skateboard, because she represents what we wanted to be as kids.”

https://sinlenceria.bandcamp.com/