Tag Archives: social justice

Exclusive demo listen: Darkest Before the Dawn – new protest anthem by Josh Gray

Since singer-songwriter Josh Gray released his first EP, a little over 2 years ago, he moved to Nashville and has been fine tuning his craft as well as keeping his fans in a growing suspense. Now he has just started a Kickstarter campaign in order to fund the recording of his first full length album with the help of music fans everywhere. Many record labels, in Josh’s opinion, “don’t think truth sells” and he is “not willing to compromise” so he is reaching out the people. As part of letting his protest voice be heard Shouts is premiering exclusively a rough, yet somehow perfect still, demo of one of the songs of the upcoming album, entitled Darkest Before the Dawn.

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Like a quiet, gentle anthem of a song, it focuses on Josh’s voice as it floats beautifully through issues such as mass incarceration, racism, patriarchal abortion laws and gender equality:

“every orientation and gender deserves equality, you ain’t saving souls, trying to control, the lives of those, you’ve never seen”

Josh has never been one to shy away either from holding his own country accountable nor the acknowledgment of his own privilege in this world:

“let’s stop arrestin’ for minor possession, if this is the land of the free, ban private prisons that enslave millions, because they don’t look like me”.

When we asked Josh what the song was about he replied firmly: “It’s clearly a protest song and it covers a lot of ground. I’d prefer to not say exactly what it’s about and instead let the listener find out for themselves. If you listen and it pisses you off then you’re the kind of person who needs to hear it.”

Be sure to check out the album campaign and be a part of creating something positive in this turbulent world. And listen to the exclusive feature below:

 

Kickstarter Campaign Link: https://kck.st/2OwIhOA

 


 

Raye Zaragoza (interview)

Cover photo by Terry Bruce Herring

Since releasing her debut album ‘Fight For You’ (2017) Raye Zaragoza has been titled a protest singer, and she is fine with that. Injustice and inequality inspire her to write songs that can power protesters in their fights for nature and fellow people. But Raye is also more than just a protest singer as she explains in the interview below. She tackles anything that inspires her with an enormously soothing voice and vulnerable honesty. Raye was kind enough to take time while on tour to answer a few questions about her music and activism.

First off, for those not familiar with your work, who is Raye Zaragoza?

“Hi everyone! I’m an LA-based, New York City-born singer-songwriter. My latest album Fight For You is a collection of songs of social justice and finding your voice. I’m very passionate about writing about topics that are not talked about in mainstream music such as politics and indigenous rights.”

How and when did you get into making music?

“I started writing songs in my late teenage years, but I’ve been singing and playing guitar since I was 12. In middle school, I had a little band with my friends and we played Avril Lavigne and Vanessa Carlton songs at local restaurants in Hell’s Kitchen, New York (where I lived in my pre-teen years). I grew up doing musical theater, and always knew I wanted to be a performer, but it wasn’t until my late teenage years that I realized being a singer-songwriter is what I always wanted to be doing.”

When did you realise you could use your music to spread messages of protest or activism?

“Although I had written some social justice songs before this, I really started writing songs with an activist message during the Standing Rock movement. During that time I realized how much a song can comfort and inspire people who are fighting injustice. Speaking up can be a vulnerable and scary thing, and music can truly make you feel stronger and not alone. Many of my songs from Fight For You were written about Standing Rock and my journey there.”

How do you feel people are receiving your political music these days?

“With the exception of the expected occasional backlash, the response has been overwhelmingly positive. It’s really been amazing to hear stories about how the songs have comforted people in tough times.”

How important is it for you to send out a specific message in your music? Are all your songs tackling a political subject?

“No — not all of my songs are tackling a political message. I write songs about all kinds of subjects — like nature, love, heartbreak, New York City, California, and anything else that inspires me! I’ve definitely been labeled as a protest songwriter after this album, and although I don’t have a problem with that, it’s definitely not all I do. I like to write songs with light-hearted messages too!”

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Photo by Ursula Vari

Do you find it hard to balance between being political and poetic in your lyrics?

“I think that’s exactly my favorite part about it — when the poetry meets the politics. When a verse or a line can help make sense of the madness around us. I feel like social justice music is really what keeps the movement moving and the activists inspired — so for me, even if it’s a challenge at times, finding the balance is the most rewarding part.”

How do you see the current music scene, is there an abundance of socially conscious music today or a lack of people using their voice and talent for good?

“I think there are definitely more and more artists speaking up through their music. I think regardless of whether an artist writes social justice songs or not, it’s very important to be vocal on their platforms. People look to artists for guidance and inspiration — so it’s important we share a positive message.”

What are some of your inspirations or favourite protest musicians out there, active or not?

“I love Joan Baez, Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan. I also love my friends Calina Lawrence and Nahko Bear who are doing so much as activists and artists currently.”

Outside the music, do you partake in any other activism?

“Absolutely. Whenever I’m not on the road, I am very involved in my indigenous community in LA. Last year, I participated in the Run4Salmon, and March to Oak Flat — two indigenous rights causes very in need of support (everyone should look them up!). This year, I hope to return to both and continue to contribute to the protection of indigenous sites around the country.”

Photo 2 by Ursula Vari
Photo by Ursula Vari

What is on the horizon for you?

“I am currently working on my next album that will be released in 2019. I am also touring around the US, Canada, and Europe for the rest of 2018!”

Thank you very much for participating and for the music you make. Anything else you’d like to shout from the rooftops?

“Thank you for having me! if you’re hearing of me for the first time, I hope to meet you at a live show soon!!!”

You can catch Raye currently on tour. Check out her webpage for further details.

Justice finally served for 1973 murder of Chilean musician Victor Jara

During the 1973 coup in Chile, when dictator Augusto Pinochet was placed in power, thousands of citizens were detained and some were tortured, and others murdered, while in custody at the National Stadium of Chile. Among those was poet, musician and professor Victor Jara. For decades his partner, dancer and activist Joan Jara, has been fighting for justice. Finally on July 3rd, 2018, the Chilean Judiciary Power declared that 9 retired members of the Chilean military have been sentenced for the murder of Jara.

Twitter Poder Judicial Chile

While in exile, Joan released a song that belonged to an album Victor was working on before he got detained and consequently murdered. In Manifesto Victor sings:

manifesto victor jara

 

 

 

Support our project

If you would like to support the Shouts project then we can continue to cover global protest music, update the webpage functionality and offer more in depth interviews with socially conscious musicians from around the globe. If you would like to participate we would be very grateful and we promise to continue providing you with fresh, protest music voices!

$10.00