Tag Archives: social justice

A Protest Music Interview: Stray

Being homeless for the first time at the age of 8 is perhaps, and hopefully, not something too many people can relate with. That was the reality for Stray, a young singer songwriter who just released her first album.

The protest music piece was recorded by herself on the farm where she now lives free from abuse and where she helps others get through similar things.

Halldór: First of all, for those who are not familiar with your work, who is Stray?

Stray: First homeless at the age of 8, I once roamed the streets alone like a cat, rummaging through the bins. At 21 I bought my first guitar at a flea market and started teaching myself to play. I sing about social, environmental, and economic justice in my music.

Halldór: You describe yourself as an artist who uses her voice to talk about issues that both have personally affected you as well as other things you deem necessary talk about. Why do you think music is such a great way to get political messages across?

Stray: The personal is political, I was homeless on and off due to severe abuse, couldn’t seek shelter at any of the local churches because I’m gay, and couldn’t afford apartments by myself due to poverty. So I was often trapped and choosing between an abusive home life or a homeless life.

These are traumas that I couldn’t talk about with people, both because trauma often makes us speechless, but because it had been dangerous for me to open up to people, and I also didn’t want to upset anyone else. You partially keep your trauma secret to nurture others.

So music was the only way I could speak about what I was going through. Music tells untold truths, and protest music speaks truth to power, so they’re a perfect medium for political expression.

Halldór: Your debut album was recently released. Can you tell us about the creative and recording process of the album and the inspiration behind some of the songs?

Stray: These songs are my voice for when I had none. I wrote them during a time when I was terribly isolated. I had officially escaped from my abusive family, ending all contact with them, and was also escaping a different toxic environment.

I moved with all my savings to a broken down farm and started rebuilding myself from the ground up. This album tells that story. I believe Lost & Found, Burning Bridges, and Skeleton Key are the soul of the album. I recorded everything myself on the farm, turning a small bedroom into a little studio.

Even though the writing and recording of the album was done entirely alone, I now share my studio space with others, so that they don’t have to face the same financial obstacles I did along the way. I call it the Marginal Music Collective.

Halldór: Besides your music, which obviously is a tool for activism, what other activism do you partake in?

Stray: I believe in direct action and mutual aid. We can’t rely on hierarchical institutions to save us, many of them maintain the status quo or do more harm than good by entering communities and “saving” them by telling them they know “better”.

As a working class person myself, I grow food for the working class and homeless on my farm and share it with others for free and for donation. I volunteer with Food Not Bombs protesting environmental injustice, poverty, and imperialism, while feeding people.

When friends have been abused at home or were homeless, I’ve taken them in, knowing personally what it’s like to go hungry and go it alone, I refuse to allow that to happen to others.

Halldór: According to your Bandcamp profile you sound like a superhero, feeding people at your farm by day and recording protest music by night. Can you explain more about your farm and the life you live there with other people?

Stray: hahaha aww thank you! I founded Forest Moon Farm as a sanctuary for marginalized people and rescue animals. It’s a permaculture farm designed with environmentalist and organic principles and the garden is full of circles and spirals in accord with nature. I live here peacefully with two other people.

People come and visit to learn about organic gardening and permaculture, get free food, do yoga, and eventually when we can afford to rescue some animals, spend time with animals in nature. We even have a few acres of forest for nature walks.

“I’m Burning bridges cause I can’t afford the tolls
It lights the way for all us beaten souls
I’ve had to dive in to avoid the patrols
And just keep swimming cause underwater is all I know”

from ‘Burning Bridges’ (2020)

Halldór: What musicians inspire you? Are you following other contemporary protest musicians that you want to give a shout out to?

Stray: My musical heroes are Janelle Monae, Fiona Apple, Taylor Swift, India Arie, and Ani DeFranco. I adore Blunted Lip by Laura Kerrigan, she has a beautiful voice, heartfelt lyrics, and a hilarious twitter full of queer pride and personality. I also love SoulSpot, they have great vibes and their singer and music are unbelievably smooth.

Halldór: What is on the horizon for you?

Stray: I’m doing a series of house concerts this summer, writing my second album, and I plan on adopting some goats!

Halldór: Thank you very much for participating and for the music. Anything else you’d like to shout from the rooftops?

Stray: Food, Housing, and Health Care are Human Rights!

straymusic.bandcamp.com
facebook.com/musicstray

Hugh Masekelas’s Protest Concert ‘Live In Lesotho’ From 1980 Being Re-Released

In 1980 South African trumpeter and social activist Hugh Masekela played a live concert in Lesotho, a country landlocked by his then oppressive home country.

Masekela traveled around the African continent during his career as well as the world. He played with Fela Kuti and Paul Simon. He set up a mobile recording studio in Botswana near the SA border to record Botswana artists.

Masekela released 44 studio albums and his last was called ‘No Borders’ (2016). On the cover it depicted a map of Africa from 1590, a vision of the continent before colonial powers put down divisive lines.

His impact is long lasting and now the 1980 concert in Lesotho is being re-released on vinyl by UK’s Matsuli Music.

Exclusive demo listen: Darkest Before the Dawn – new protest anthem by Josh Gray

Since singer-songwriter Josh Gray released his first EP, a little over 2 years ago, he moved to Nashville and has been fine tuning his craft as well as keeping his fans in a growing suspense. Now he has just started a Kickstarter campaign in order to fund the recording of his first full length album with the help of music fans everywhere. Many record labels, in Josh’s opinion, “don’t think truth sells” and he is “not willing to compromise” so he is reaching out the people. As part of letting his protest voice be heard Shouts is premiering exclusively a rough, yet somehow perfect still, demo of one of the songs of the upcoming album, entitled Darkest Before the Dawn.

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Like a quiet, gentle anthem of a song, it focuses on Josh’s voice as it floats beautifully through issues such as mass incarceration, racism, patriarchal abortion laws and gender equality:

“every orientation and gender deserves equality, you ain’t saving souls, trying to control, the lives of those, you’ve never seen”

Josh has never been one to shy away either from holding his own country accountable nor the acknowledgment of his own privilege in this world:

“let’s stop arrestin’ for minor possession, if this is the land of the free, ban private prisons that enslave millions, because they don’t look like me”.

When we asked Josh what the song was about he replied firmly: “It’s clearly a protest song and it covers a lot of ground. I’d prefer to not say exactly what it’s about and instead let the listener find out for themselves. If you listen and it pisses you off then you’re the kind of person who needs to hear it.”

Be sure to check out the album campaign and be a part of creating something positive in this turbulent world. And listen to the exclusive feature below:

 

Kickstarter Campaign Link: https://kck.st/2OwIhOA