Tag Archives: anti-fascist

Action For Afghanistan: Racetraitor, Disappear, Life Force, Eighteen Visions And More On New Benefit Compilation

There is moshing at home. Then there is moshing at home, knowing that you are supporting an important cause. The latter is what you can do by visiting the webpage of Another City Records and place an order for a cassette/digital version of a new compilation album, titled Action For Afghanistan.

See also: A Protest Music Interview: Racetraitor

All proceeds from the compilation, organized by Mark Bradley of Unblind and Disappear, will go directly to Women for Afghan Women and MIAAN.

“One major thing I was trying to accomplish, was to get representation from bands with diverse lineups and backgrounds (not just straight white males). A lot of time and effort went into hand selecting bands that I felt would best represent the overall message of this compilation. I think we managed to do so, and also achieved a pretty eclectic mix of bands.”
– Mark Bradley

The humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan is one of the worst in modern history. After decades of war and natural disasters, more than 20 million people are facing starvation, according to the United Nations. Women and children are especially vulnerable, so even if it is something small then still consider hitting up Another City Records and grab your copy. Many small things add up to something bigger.

Full list of participating bands can be seen below:

Change⁣
Snuffed⁣
Direct Measure⁣
Ill Communication⁣
Life Force⁣
Overstep⁣
Bystander⁣
No Longer at Ease⁣
Unblind⁣
Rejection Pact⁣
Bitter Truth⁣
Racetraitor⁣
Optimal Crime⁣
Disappear⁣
Prison Suicide⁣
The Geeks⁣
FAIM⁣
Terminal Nation⁣
Si Dios Quiere⁣
Berthold City⁣
Soul Charge⁣
Eighteen Visions⁣
Tuning⁣
Discourage⁣
Last Gasp⁣
Miracle Drug⁣
Moral Law⁣
One Up⁣
Bull Cult⁣
Godhead⁣
Second Life⁣
Despair


Artists Lend Their Voices To A New Documentary About Protest Art

If you recall statues of a naked Donald Trump popping up across cities in the US then you might have heard of the anonymous protest art collective Indecline. For the past few years the group has been collecting footage that now has turned into a 45 minute long documentary.

One unnamed representative for the group told Rolling Stone that “What was once set up to be a deep dive into the history of resistance art, soon became a ‘call to action.’”. Via Rolling Stone’s large platform the documentary can now exclusively be streamed in full.

Throughout the film we get a reminder of the stunningly creative, elaborate and always illegal protest art that Indecline has made like renting a room at Trump tower only to create a prison inside that room filled with rats and a Trump impersonator. Lending their voices to share their thoughts on protest art are some protest musicians such as Tom Morello, Moby, Fat Mike and Nadya Tolokonnikova among many more.

Damien Echols, who was wrongfully sent to death row as one of the West Memphis Three, speaks of how protest art literally helped save him from a state ordered execution.

Art and humour have long lived together as well. The film clearly shows how humour is necessary to get a message across. After all, humour is closely related to positivity – and kindness. One of the representatives of Indecline, when interviewed, has a cop in the background who is tied up on a chair. The Indecline representative quickly asks the cop if he is ok before continuing to answer the questions.

The film is directed by Colin Day who directed Saving Banksy. Banksy is another artist who’s work is documented in the film for his creative graffiti that has caught the attention (and inspired resistance) around the whole world.

Original photo credits: ©Hannah Verbeuren

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Moroccan Rapper Gets 1 Year Prison Sentence For Insulting The Police

Moroccan artists have long had to face serious oppression and attacks on to their freedom of expression. The latest victim of Moroccan government and police system is rapper Gnawi (real name Mohamed Mounir) who recently rapped on a track that criticizes the government and the economic division that young and older people experience on a daily basis.

The track’s lyrics cover a lot of ground and even criticize the king of Morocco which is a criminal offense in the country.

Apparently Gnawi can appeal the court’s decision. We at Shouts call upon the Moroccan government to stop oppressing free speech and artists’ freedom to create and work.

One can only wonder why governments are so afraid of music. After all, they are the ones with the big weapons – how much can a rap song harm them? A protest song is supposed inspire the masses though, and if successful, the people who listen and take the message to heart can join hands and tear down fascist governments.

That must be why governments put singers in prison. To prevent such possible damage to their powers. That is also why we must all keep on singing, and fight for the rights of those currently locked up.

Cover photo credits: Instagram/gnawiofficial