Tag Archives: anti-war

New Protest Music Literature: Music Is Power: Popular Songs, Social Justice, And The Will To Change (Video)

In 2020 protest musicians continue to make music and writers also continue to document that music. Fresh onto the bookshelves is Music Is Power: Popular Songs, Social Justice, And The Will To Change which for any audience of Shouts and followers of protest music might just be of interest.

A wonderful video can be found after reading the first passages of the book. The author, Brad Schreiber, insists that it is “greatest antiwar song ever created is by a group you have likely never heard about. See for yourself with the video below:

“once again we hear the word “precision”
from people who think bombs can be precise
we hear “the price of fighting terrorism”
from people who don’t have to pay that price
we see a cloud where there should be a college
we see a reservoir reduced to soil
and though they now admit that the marketplace was hit,
they didn’t hit the Ministry of Oil

what they call a military target
is sacred to all soldiers brave and loyal
you can bomb a shrine, you can bomb a power line,
but you never bomb the Ministry of Oil

once again the mayhem they call “warfare”
is followed by the melee they call “peace”
tearing through the stores and the museums
while the US Army played police
how much do you suppose that artwork sold for
as their last remaining food began to spoil
the situation’s bad, but no place in Baghdad
is safer than the Ministry of Oil

the medicine has all been confiscated
and soon there won’t be water left to boil
and one might wonder who’d think up names like “Oil for food”
when what they mean is “Ministry of Oil”

if there’s any logic in the universe
if the future isn’t just absurd
if justice is precise instead of infinite
if freedom is enjoyed and not endured
I’ll take my class out someday on a field trip
past the shells of Shell and Uniroyal
and as they’re roaming round the musty White House grounds,
I’ll say “Kids, this was the Ministry of Oil”

I’ll say “Kids, it was a peaceful revolution,
there weren’t any battles to embroil,
and I’m very glad to tell that not one person fell
it’s an aspect of our history that every child knows well
how we failed to avoid one building being destroyed,
but at least it was the Ministry of Oil.”

http://princemyshkins.com

Palestinian Protest Musician Jowan Safadi Releases ‘Super White Man’ (Video)

Roughly 1 year ago we covered the fundraising efforts of Palestinian protest musician Jowan Safadi. At the time he had 2 new albums in the works and now he contacted Shouts HQ’s to let us know of the success of the albums. Now he has released a new single titled ‘Super White Man’ (الرجل الأبيض الخارق) that comes in a beautiful animated video package.

A veteran of the protest music scene, Safadi has been writing music for the past 20 years about his experience as an artist and human being living in Palestine territories.

See also: “Palestinian Protest Musician Raising Funds For 2 New Albums”

Safadi wrote us a message about how his songs had traveled across the Arab world and its protests:

“…first of all allow me to thank you for the support with the album crowdfunding, a year ago. It came out and had a decent success. Songs featured there were played in the Lebanon revolution and protests around the Arab world.”

In ‘Super White Man’ Safadi addresses the powers that oppress and inflict perpetual pain onto people. Safadi himself has been arrested, tortured and oppressed by Israel, Jordan and other authorities and in the song he paint as picture of his experience in order to raise awareness of the issue.

“They told me everything about the holocaust
but no one told why I should pay the cost
They played wars and told me that I lost
and all the losers were forced to flee
Oh, super white man
Salamo alikom (peace upon you)
How does it feel
to solve your problem
and create one for me
and when… will I be free?”

– from Super White Man by Jowan Safadi (2019)

Cover photo credits: Jowan Safadi Facebook

When The Musician Is Censored The Audience Sing

The fact that governments censor music and openly show their fear of lyrics and an artist’s performance demonstrates the power of that music. It can strike courage into the good and fear into the greedy and it can move the masses.

Iranian singer Mehdi Yarrahi had to walk off the stage at a recent concert because the Iranian government has censored his popular protest song Pareh Sang. This is an anti-war song in which Yarrahi sings about the conflict between Iran and Iraq that has been hurting people on both sides for many years.

Because of the censorship only the song’s audio was played through the sound system and Yarrahi left the stage.

So, the audience took it to themselves to carry on the message and joined together singing the uncensored lyrics, as seen in the video below.

Cover image is a snapshot from Mehdi Yarrahi’s music video on YouTube.