Tag Archives: black lives matter

Exclusive Premiere: Debut Music Video From Jamie Holmes

Some musicians make a song or two, consciously in protest, and the rest of their catalog is often something else. Others perhaps get into using their voice responsibly at some point during their career. As soon as young Jamie Holmes was in primary school, he learned about Dylan’s “Blowin’ In The Wind” which inspired him to dive further into protest music. Later his learning path led to other legendary protest musicians such as Pete Seeger and Joan Baez. The latter he was fortunate enough to meet when he was in high school.

“…in high school, my guitar teacher was Jim Kirkpatrick. He managed to go on tour around America I think with Thea Gilmore, who was supporting Baez! Well, Jim knew how much I adored Joan Baez – I’d listen to her music for hours – so he contacted her manager and asked if I could go backstage! The show was great. Her voice is incredible, and it is the same today (if not better) than when she was still in her 20s. When I went backstage I was super nervous and star-struck, but we had a chat about my own music and what I wanted to do – it was great, and she inspired my guitar playing to become more finger-picked rather than with a plectrum – something you can hear on ‘Green Revolution'”.

The self-declared “proud socialist” told me he wants to make a difference in the world. His debut album focuses on the future, climate change, the Black Lives Matter movement, police brutality, and the strange year of 2020. The first single off the album has already gotten airplay on BBC radio and it will drop on all streaming services on the 22nd of January. The music video, which features a time-lapse recording of Jamie himself painting, can be viewed exclusively below.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE
Green Revolution by Jamie Holmes

Check out Jamie’s webpage for all updates on the upcoming debut album and his social media for more info: InstagramYouTube

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Music Video Of The Day: 12 O’clock Rock By The Cornel West Theory

Veterans of the rap scene in Washington D.C. The Cornel West Theory (CWT) have released a new album titled ‘By The Time I Get To Minnesota’. For those who don’t know CWT we recommend you check them out. This is raw, brutal, rap music with some punk elements to it. Lyrically these guys are the real deal. This is real rap that holds nothing back. CWT have dedicated their career to rhymes that take on the government, hold the powerful to account and create a voice for the voiceless.

Now they have released a music video for one of the outstanding banging tracks of the album, 12 O’Clock Rock. This track is a personal favorite at Shouts HQ’s so we do hope you check it out.

See also: “Wack Rappers Beware: Interview With DC Rapper Tim Hicks & Exclusive Song Premiere”

Tim Hicks, frontman of the group, explained to us the motivation behind the track: “That song was inspired by the unfortunate murders of American citizens in the Black communities and the constant denial of justice. It was inspired by the uprisings and made as a wake up call for the climate being created by law enforcement within the USA.”

“We just aimed to make an album full of protest anthems and this one was directly influenced by the reality of cops getting away with murder and the reaction of society to such action.”

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Artists Lend Their Voices To A New Documentary About Protest Art

If you recall statues of a naked Donald Trump popping up across cities in the US then you might have heard of the anonymous protest art collective Indecline. For the past few years the group has been collecting footage that now has turned into a 45 minute long documentary.

One unnamed representative for the group told Rolling Stone that “What was once set up to be a deep dive into the history of resistance art, soon became a ‘call to action.’”. Via Rolling Stone’s large platform the documentary can now exclusively be streamed in full.

Throughout the film we get a reminder of the stunningly creative, elaborate and always illegal protest art that Indecline has made like renting a room at Trump tower only to create a prison inside that room filled with rats and a Trump impersonator. Lending their voices to share their thoughts on protest art are some protest musicians such as Tom Morello, Moby, Fat Mike and Nadya Tolokonnikova among many more.

Damien Echols, who was wrongfully sent to death row as one of the West Memphis Three, speaks of how protest art literally helped save him from a state ordered execution.

Art and humour have long lived together as well. The film clearly shows how humour is necessary to get a message across. After all, humour is closely related to positivity – and kindness. One of the representatives of Indecline, when interviewed, has a cop in the background who is tied up on a chair. The Indecline representative quickly asks the cop if he is ok before continuing to answer the questions.

The film is directed by Colin Day who directed Saving Banksy. Banksy is another artist who’s work is documented in the film for his creative graffiti that has caught the attention (and inspired resistance) around the whole world.

Original photo credits: ©Hannah Verbeuren

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