Tag Archives: police brutality

Exclusive Premiere: Debut Music Video From Jamie Holmes

Some musicians make a song or two, consciously in protest, and the rest of their catalog is often something else. Others perhaps get into using their voice responsibly at some point during their career. As soon as young Jamie Holmes was in primary school, he learned about Dylan’s “Blowin’ In The Wind” which inspired him to dive further into protest music. Later his learning path led to other legendary protest musicians such as Pete Seeger and Joan Baez. The latter he was fortunate enough to meet when he was in high school.

“…in high school, my guitar teacher was Jim Kirkpatrick. He managed to go on tour around America I think with Thea Gilmore, who was supporting Baez! Well, Jim knew how much I adored Joan Baez – I’d listen to her music for hours – so he contacted her manager and asked if I could go backstage! The show was great. Her voice is incredible, and it is the same today (if not better) than when she was still in her 20s. When I went backstage I was super nervous and star-struck, but we had a chat about my own music and what I wanted to do – it was great, and she inspired my guitar playing to become more finger-picked rather than with a plectrum – something you can hear on ‘Green Revolution'”.

The self-declared “proud socialist” told me he wants to make a difference in the world. His debut album focuses on the future, climate change, the Black Lives Matter movement, police brutality, and the strange year of 2020. The first single off the album has already gotten airplay on BBC radio and it will drop on all streaming services on the 22nd of January. The music video, which features a time-lapse recording of Jamie himself painting, can be viewed exclusively below.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE
Green Revolution by Jamie Holmes

Check out Jamie’s webpage for all updates on the upcoming debut album and his social media for more info: InstagramYouTube

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New Mixtape, Covering The Opioid Crisis, Police Brutality And More, Hits Hard

Japanese-American MC Kensho Kuma is more than a rapper. He is a teacher, NGO board member, organiser and an activist. His latest project is a mix tape where on some of the songs he covers current issues (of the U.S.) such as the brutality that the police have forced on its citizens, the opioid crisis, the education system and more. The tape is mixed by veteran DJ Kevvy Kev.

The mix tape showcases Kensho’s skills as a lyricist as he goes off dropping rhythmic bars left and right. There is an old school feeling to his flow as he throws down rhymes over the occasional scratching beats. A unique flavor to Kensho’s rap is his bilingual use of English and Japanese – a truly fascinating touch to the music.

Via email Kensho told Shouts about his projects outside of his music. He serves on the Board of Directors for Bay Area NGO Hip Hop 4 Change. The project “provides self-determination for local hip hop culture, and provides another form of representation for hip hop culture that is not given to us by the hip hop industry. We are dedicated to fighting socioeconomic inequalities through the implementation of Hip Hop culture. We do this through our three pillars, which are the grassroots campaigning team, educational outreach with a hip hop curriculum, and events, which highlight local artists.

Our grassroots officers were known for canvassing all over the Bay Area before the pandemic struck. Our educational outreach team has taught 22,000 students in grades K-12  thus far; our classes focus on not only the 4 elements of Hip Hop culture, but the history of it as well. Our local showcase series books local artists, as well as well-known legends like Talib Kweli and KRS One. Furthermore, we have recently received a grant to create an in-house studio which will be free for artists under 24. HH4C also recently received the Ellen Magnin Newman award for Outstanding Arts Organization from the SF Symphony, and the Award for Social Change from the Zellerbach Family Foundation.

I am also a Director of Return of the Cypher event in San Francisco. ROTC is an weekly open-mic jam session which occurred every Sunday night at the Boom Boom Room in the SF Fillmore district; MC’s, vocalists, and instrumentalists rocked with our in-house band. We started back in 2013, and with an exception of several Sundays, we have never missed a show. Many supporters consider ROTC to be “where Hip Hop culture resides in the SF Bay Area.”

In addition to featuring a  traditional dance party segment with DJ Kevvy Kev, ROTC has had weekly featured performers who came from around the world, freestyle competitions and producer showcases. Hip Hop legends, including the RZA, Large Professor, and Lyrics Born have made appearances on our stage as well. ROTC has also done charity work for the community, such as holiday and Christmas toy drives, working closely with Hip Hop For Change. Although we have been closed since February due to the pandemic, we cannot wait to continue the event when we are able to.

Furthermore, my daytime career has always been teaching. The vast majority of my experience took place in marginalized POC communities, so I am naturally more aware of the conditions in these urban communities.”

Kensho Kuma (photo provided by the artist)

Although Kensho does all this community work he does not see himself as a protest musician: “I do not consider myself to be a political MC or an activist. I just feel that the current sociopolitical climate demands that adults with morals raised by Hip Hop culture vocalise what is going on. In other words, we must voice certain controversial topics right now, because we are products of this culture.”

Check out more of Kensho’s work via his webpage, kenshokuma.com.

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Music Video Of The Day: We Should Be United By Matt Gibbons

This single by Matt Gibbons was originally written for the 2018 U.S. midterm election but it stands as relevant today as it did then. In his press release Matt hopes that the song can relate and bond listeners instead of them feeling alienated and divided:

“This song is a well wish for American hearts. May we, one by one, go deeper on each issue that makes us only seem divided. Where it’s race may we experience common humanity. Where it’s politics may we wish well for all Americans. Where it’s the gun issue, may we remember the essence of cares on both sides, the desire to protect loved ones. May each American do the hard work that law and policy can never do, that is, trying to understand “the other,” so the other is not foreign, but “countryman.”

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